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20121129
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think on any party on going over the cliff. secondly, there are some cuts that go in automatically at the beginning of january that would be difficult to unravel, but you could, as ari said do, that theoretically. remember, the fiscal cliff is an idea that was put forward by republicans -- >> of course. >> as an austerity plan. i agree with ari in the sense that it's a total artifice. there's no reason why you necessarily need to have that, but railroad ama-- ari makes th good point that home ownership and charitable giving are two things in the tax code we want to keep in place. all economists are nearly unanimous if you raise rates on the top 2% you will shave off 0.1% of gdp. you will have no effect on economic growth if you increase tacks on the extraordinarily wealthy here. but, you know, again, this is a party that has campaigned for three years now on cutting the deficit, on cutting government spending. it's unbelievable to me that when you come down to the 11th hour in the negotiations right now, this party cannot identify any significant cuts of any significant scale in ei
for you. in republicans' counteroffer to avert the fiscal cliff, the rich get to keep their bush era tax cuts, even as the boehner budget slashes $1.2 trillion in spending, half of it from medicare, medicaid, and other social programs. it is a lump of coal delivered by the republican reindeer to the vast majority of americans. as for new revenues, they have reached in santa's sack for that old favorite. they plan to raise $800 billion by closing loopholes and deductions. only one problem a problem that flummoxes no less than mitt romney and paul ryan throughout the campaign, a problem as real today as it will be tomorrow -- the math. as the president explained in his first post-election interview on bloomberg this afternoon. >> it's a simple proposition that you can't raise enough revenue, and if you don't raise enough revenue through closing loopholes and deductions, then it's going to be middle class families who make up the difference. >> indeed. as the president notes, you can't get $800 billion in revenue without eliminating, for example, charitable deductions, which would put all m
-established on january 3rd. my sense is going off the fiscal slope or curve or cliff is probably the best case scenario for president obama. >> professor reich, the president has offered a mix of taxes and spending cuts in his plan. mr. boehner responded with the ryan budget five minutes after saying they wanted a bipartisan solution. have they put any thought whatsoever into any of this? what have they been doing on all their days off. >> i don't think they've been doing anything but licking their wounds. basically the republicans are hunkered down. they don't seem able or willing to come up with any compromise, any genuine compromise, they haven't for the entire administration up until now. why should we suppose they're going to do so right at this moment? it's a lame duck congress. anybody who thinks this congress is going to come up with and the republicans in this congress are going to come up with some solution doesn't understand the republican house of represent at thises and doesn't under ducks. >> to that point, 114 million americans will see their taxes go up in four weeks. i mean, you say th
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3